Archives for posts with tag: T2CrossFit

Written Friday, 16 September from home.

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Watching for the next wave

That’s correct; the season is almost finished. Our vacation is over, we are home, came home yesterday, and the boat will be hauled out in less than two weeks.. The weather forecast which had seemed OK at the beginning of our final two weeks, crapped out on us again with winds blowing well into the high 20 kt. Still we had fun. And so did the dogs.

After our first day playing in AbFab, we continued the practice Wednesday-Sunday. We didn’t use San Graal to go anywhere as the forecast couldn’t string together two days in a row where the wind would be favorable for anchoring or passage-making; but the beginning of the second week looked promising.

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This is where they ran. Was covered with water at the beginning of the season

We explored harbors and beaches we hadn’t got to/couldn’t get to with the big boat. There is something to be said for stepping off the boat into knee deep water and walking the anchor in to set it. We took picnic lunches and treats for the dogs. We met other dogs and their owners and the dogs had wonderful puppy play dates. And they got to run. And run. And run. Probably ruined them as hunting dogs now because they spent most of their time flushing and chasing after seagulls and sandpipers.

We tied the RIB to the dock across from the big boat and every time the dogs would come back from shore to San Graal, Ebba would invariably jump into AbFab and look at us expectantly, like, “Come on, let’s go play.” And she just loved the speed and trying to eat the bow waves.

On one occasion, we came back from a burn around the bay and obviously both dogs were desperate to potty because as we came close to the dock, even before we had had time to wrap a rope around a cleat, both dogs jump off on to the dock and side-by-side, they trotted down towards shore, pee’d, and together, trotted back to the boat. And neither Paul nor I had to call them once. It was very funny and rather cute to watch.

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Long tether

As I mentioned, Ebba loves to lean over the side and try to eat the waves. Or at least she barks very loudly at them. I, obviously, have to keep a very tight leash on her otherwise she would be over the side and in the water in her excitement. Initially, I let her have enough slack so that she was able to put her head almost in the water. But then I got to thinking that that was probably not such a good idea. If she fell overboard whilst we were doing 20+kt, the drag would probably rip off her head. So I shortened her leash, much to her annoyance, and reasoned that if she did slip over then at least it would only be her back legs that got dragged.

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Shorter tether

And as if to vilify my reasoning and actions, Paul shared an article published in a boating magazine, Practical Boat Owner, that had done a study on tethers – long vs short – and concluded that although the short tether is more bothersome in that it has to be continually clipped, unclipped and reclipped, it was more likely to prevent you from drowning and/or being bashed against the hull of the boat.

This week, our last week of vacation, we managed to get across to Canada and visited Colchester Harbor – a new port for us. Very tiny, lovely people, dog friendly, a rather weedy beach (but that was probably because they had had strong onshore winds) and town is closed on Mondays – when we were there. The plan was to spend the night there and then mosey on eastwards to Leamington, spend the night there and then come back across to Sandusky. But the wind decided to switch direction and strength earlier than predicted so we left Colchester in an increasing SW wind – bad direction for Colchester’s harbor. Narrow entrance + big waves made for some nerve-wracking moments. We ended up at Middle Bass Island State Park Marina.

On my soap box: all Canadian marinas monitor, I think, CH 16 and 68. US marinas have no consistency in channels monitored. So calling MBISPM on CH 9, then 16, and 68 was met with utter silence. I ended up calling on the phone to make sure there was room for us. When I registered, I asked if they had heard my calling – I always wonder if the radio has malfunctioned – and they said, “No”. Hmm … “don’t you monitor CH 16?” “No, only CH 71.” I thought it was unwritten boating law that everyone listening to marine radio would listen to/dual watch with CH 16, the international distress calling channel because you never know, you might just be the one to pick up the Mayday distress call and need to pass it on to the Coast Guard.  Off my soap box.

I have always had mixed feelings about MBI marina, mainly because of the amount of goose poop that was always lying on the ground. I knew it wouldn’t be a good match for the dogs because if there is one delicacy that my dogs love, it is goose poop. Fresh or old, doesn’t make a difference. However, I was pleasantly surprised this time; there was very little around. Made walking the dogs so much more fun without having to constantly tell them to, “Leave it”. And because the place was virtually empty, they were very lenient about me not putting the dogs on their leashes. I know the staff must have seen the dogs running but they didn’t cause any trouble, the dogs or the staff. And we found a new path through the trees to explore with squirrels and chipmunks and a few geese and lots of ducks. Dog heaven.

One thing that did come out of this forced in-harbor stay was that I managed to get both dogs to run with me while on their leashes. Ebba was already a master at it but Bella was rather a loose cannon when squirrels were darting about. Ebba did a good job of setting the example and Bella is a fast learner and a good mimicker.

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Hard to take a selfie when bouncing along at 20kt

So here we are, at the end of another season, one that was rather shorter than usual due to one thing or another, David and Bekah had a baby and we had to of and visit, we opened our own gym, Anna and Brad got married, Anna qualified for the 2016 Reebok CrossFit Games … But it was a good one particularly with respect to the learning curve for both us, Paul and me, and the dogs. Last year, we had Ebba, one dog on board; we really were quite apprehensive at the start of this season as to how the dogs would cope together in such a confined space. And we had similar issues. Ultimately though, all’s well that ends well except we never got them to pee or poop on the boat. But most importantly, the dogs like boating and, we like Boating with Dogs!

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Written Wednesday 7 September 2016

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At anchor off Kelleys Island’s State Park campground

Today was the first day of the second part of our ‘holiday’ for this year. We had to take a break from cruising because we had a wedding to attend. And it was a beautiful wedding too. Congratulations to Anna and Brad.

But I digress. Really, yesterday was the first day – very simple, all we had to do was pack the truck with everything except the kitchen sink this time, and head north. That kinda changed though as I had a brilliant idea on my return from my super early workout at T²CrossFit, and as I parked my car in the garage next to AbFab and accumulated junk, “Why don’t we take the RIB with us given that the weather forecast was deteriorating for extended cruising?” “Brilliant”, says Paul and then all hell breaks loose.

You see, it’s just not that simple. It should be but it isn’t – hooking up the trailer and pulling it and the boat out of the garage wasn’t going to happen. Recall I mentioned accumulated junk? Hmmm. There is a lot of it and it is all around and in front of the trailer, along with other stuff that isn’t junk but still needed to be moved.

I still had my packing plan for food etc and had to get that done before I could give a hand with AbFab so Paul had to manage on his own. The dogs tried but even they eventually gave up and came in. Their tender, young ears couldn’t take any more of it.

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Queen of her castle (rock) Puppy Ebba

The boat has been in the garage for a while without being used so needless to say, when Paul tried to lift the engine off the ground in order to move the boat out of the garage, the engine didn’t move. No power in the battery. Plug the battery into the charger; one hour later, no power. This brilliant idea was not necessarily as shiny an idea as it was initially. Fortunately the local Auto Zone had a replacement that fitted perfectly and had charge in it. Zip, up comes the engine, out goes the boat on the trailer…. and then the roofer calls to see if he can come around to look at the roof. The dogs, in the meantime, collapse in an exasperated heap in the house.

There is plenty more but I will spare you the details – they don’t add much more to the picture that I hope I have already painted. Except, the reason I didn’t pack the kitchen sink this time was because my plan was to go shopping when we got to Sandusky; Paul would entertain the dogs while I shopped.

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Zoom, zoom around Sandusky Bay

Upon arrival in Sandusky, our first call was the launch ramp. After reversing the trailer into the water with Paul on board, my next job was to unhook the boat and push it on its way with Paul at the helm. This was going fine when I heard a little doggy squeak right next to my ear. Looked up and there was Ebba on the back cover of the truck. She had climbed out the cab’s little rear window. It was a bit of a squeeze for her but in her frantic excitement of not being left behind, she completely ignored the seat headrest digging into her chest and belly as she wormed her way out. The only way down was for her to squeeze back through; there was no way I was going to lift her down. Both dogs finally were safely aboard with Paul and they set off to meet me at the dock. Oh they were soooooo happy. All three of them.

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Fun times running, playing chase

This was really when I had planned on going to the grocery store but fortunately I didn’t because we had a great afternoon. I left everything in the truck. Paul yelled to grab bathing suits for him and me and climb aboard. My bathing suit (aka sports bra and shorts) was in the truck! So was Paul’s but who cared. The dogs wanted to go swimming and Paul wanted to blast around the Bay. So we did, all of it.

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Not so much room on AbFab as on San Graal

The dogs swam and swam then ran and ran and chased and chased the birds.

We were all so tired when we eventually got back to the dock to say Hi to San Graal. Which we did by giving her a bath. I would hate to see her if we left her for 3 weeks instead of 2. The spiders, webs, dead flies and insect poop were all just disgusting.

That done, the truck unloaded, the onboard fridges packed with the food that I did bring, there was now no way I was going to the grocery store. I’d go tomorrow.

Ha! That didn’t happen either.

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Being responsible : Paul carrying full poop bag back to the boat.

After a walk/run, breakfast and lazy half a morning, the plan was to pack a picnic lunch with tea in our hot mugs, zoom to the north side of Kelleys Island and anchor off the beach and swim, walk, whatever. Which we did. On the way across, at first Ebba and Bella were really excited, barking at and trying to swat the waves. Eventually though, Bella decided that bouncing off one wave to the next was not such a good idea and lay down. Ebba kept swatting though even she succumbed eventually and lay down. I think Ebba, at least, also felt a little queasy but fortunately she wasn’t sick. The beach and swim made up for it.

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Making sure the anchor is set, “Yes, my foot is on it.”

We had our picnic, then rather than heading straight back to the marina, we decided to visit Put-In-Bay. The thought processes behind this were very practical actually. Between Kelleys Island and South Bass Island, the waves would be less because we were in the lee of South Bass Island. And after leaving Put-In-Bay, there is a little dog-leg to the south west around the south west end of the island and then ‘surf the waves all the way home’.

By this time, the temperature on shore ‘felt like 101F’. Why would we go back to the marina and swelter there? So we didn’t. We anchored off the east side of Sandy Point, where we had been yesterday, and let the dogs go again. Today, there was no-one else on the beach so we just let the dogs run and swim, just whatever they wanted to do. Now, needless to say, they are tired.

Not sure what tomorrow will bring. Supposed to be as hot and windier. Guess we’ll just have to go boating with our dogs!

(Written Thursday, 11 and Friday, 12 August 2016)

IMG_1316Can’t remember where I left off with my Boating With Dogs’ blog and as of right now, we are on our way down the St Mary’s River just leaving Lake George and have no signal so I can’t check. So apologies if I repeat myself a little.

We thought we were going to have to spend an extra night at Rogers City because the weather forecast didn’t look too promising. However, as I walked the dogs along the beach in the morning, conditions didn’t look too bad so I text Paul to see if he wanted to push on to Cheboygan. By the time he answered, I was at the furthest point away, “Yes, let’s go, the sooner the better”. So what I had anticipated being leisurely walk turned into a hurry-up-dogs-we-have-to-leave almost run. It turned out that there was a swell more or less on the nose so Paul kept the revs down and I sat down below with the dogs while they lay in their bed baskets feeling sorry for themselves. They were very good. They kept down their breakfasts. Phew. I hate cleaning up barf.

We spent one night in Cheboygan MI and the dogs loved it again. Seems as though so long as there is access to water they are happy. There is a lovely beach right next to the marina and a pier to the lighthouse all of which was just perfect for them. And the marina staff were wonderful too. The dogs were allowed in the office and were given a treat to boot. I think they should have been on a leash but no-one said anything. The dogs behaved themselves and we cleaned up after them.

IMG_1354Cheboygan to Mackinaw City was quiet in contrast to the day before; just windy but the waves were less than 1ft as we made our way up the Mackinaw Straits to Straits State Marina (from a boater’s point of view, Mackinaw City’s best kept secret). The biggest swells we encountered came from the Mackinac Island ferries.

Another boat came into the marina not long after us and tied up which was fine. But then he put on his music … for everyone in the marina and onshore to listen too. I wouldn’t have minded too much if it had been pleasant music but it was awful. Eventually it got too much so I went and asked the marina staff if they would ask him to turn it down. They did speak with him and the next thing we knew, he was gone. He obviously didn’t like the fact that we didn’t all want to listen to his choice of music. I felt bad for the marina because they now have a disgruntled customer but that feeling didn’t last very long. Our afternoon and evening there were much more relaxed than they would have been. Oh, and quieter.

From Mackinaw City we made our way into Les Cheneaux . A beautiful cruising ground again. We called in at Hessel for lunch, well coffee and fudge, and then carried on to an anchorage, Government Bay. There were several other boats in the bay, a couple with dogs so the dogs ended up barking/talking to each other. Quite funny really.

Left there to make our way to the DeTour Passage and up into the North Channel. The wind had been blowing from the SE mainly but during the previous night it blew from the West making for a interesting and sickening wave motion for our trip along the coast (imagine washing machine effect). The dogs looked at us as if to say, “Are you kidding us?”

It was pretty bad. Good job Paul doesn’t get seasick. I took the dogs down into our cabin where normally movement is kept to a minimum but not on this occasion. I put on a ‘seasick’ prevention patch which usually kicks in after about half an hour. But I was too late. I felt nauseous almost immediately after we set off and ended up sleeping for most of the journey across to Drummond Island. Relief came in the calmer waters of DeTour Passage up to Harbor Island.

IMG_1388Harbor Island has a horseshoe shaped anchorage inside the island with a narrow entrance so it is totally sheltered unless it is blowing from the south, which fortunately it wasn’t.

I took the dogs ashore and we went for an explore on the island. Firstly, the dogs disappeared around a little headland and I heard a small scream. Then a woman came back around followed by the dogs. They had just scared her; she was reading a warning notice about bears and saw movement out of the corner of her eye.

I know how she felt because I had had a similar experience back at Government Bay. I was walking the dogs in the forest and saw movement behind to my left. I thought it was Bella because what I saw was black. I called the dogs expecting to find Bella come at me from that direction. But no, she came from in front with Ebba. Hmmm… what had I just seen? I didn’t wait to find out. We retraced our steps and beat a hasty retreat to the dinghy.

Back to Harbor Island. Required clothing for serious island exploring – long boots and a hat. Long boots to protect your lower legs from scratches and stinging plants and hat to prevent tree twigs getting caught in your hair.

Back on the boat, Ebba decided to try to catch dragonflies. She would stand on the swim platform, watch for them to dance by and then launch herself at them. Don’t think she ever caught on but you have to give her 100/100 for perserverance.

IMG_1437Wednesday, we ended up at Sault St Marie MI. Not a very dog friendly place. The marina was OK, clean and quiet. We had to do a 3 mile hike to get to a place where the dogs could run free. And we got to paddle in Lake Superior. Thursday, made our way back to Bruce Mines Marina. Had to check in with Canadian Customs and the officer asked me if we were tied up at the government dock. “I don’t know, we are tied up at the only dock there is.” Fortunately the Harbor Master was there and I asked him. No, the dock is owned by Bruce Mines. I told the Customs officer and this seemed to satisfy him.

Bruce Mines Marina and community – again not really a dog-friendly place. There were notices all over re dogs being kept on a leash. The shoreline is very reedy and we managed to find access to it for the dogs. I set off for the grocery store, Paul had left a few minutes before me to take Ebba and Bella to this little bit of shoreline and as I walked down the road, first I saw 3 geese come flying (literally) out of the reeds, closely followed by a very angry duck and then a brown and a black head bounding through the water, ears flying. They were happy.

This morning before we left, I was walking the dogs off-leash but saw someone coming along the road I had to take and she had her dog on a leash. I called Ebba and Bella and shackled them. As we passed each other, the lady comments, “You have 2 very well trained dogs. (Thank you) Are you just visiting? (Yes) Oh, OK then.” I think I was about to get a mouthful of abuse for not having the dogs on their leashes before. Oh well. We left.

And now we are in Milford Haven, southeast corner of St Joseph’s Island, still in Canadian waters. We had a quick trip ashore for the dogs to run and do their necessary. As we were wandering through the trees and undergrowth, low and behold in amongst the pine and fir trees, there were two apple trees. Just two. And the apples looked like Golden Delicious. Unfortunately they were not yet ripe or there wouldn’t have been any left. It was just a bit bizarre.

Now the dogs want to swim but the water is 67F. I think I’ll take them ashore again.

Thanks for reading.

Joanna

PS: We did go swimming and then because of tomorrow’s forecast, we actually moved on down to DeTour Village Marina.

Yacht: San Graal

T2CrossFit

(Mostly written Friday, 29 July 2016)

Today is the first real day of our 2-part vacation. Long story. However, we left the marina yesterday after loading up the boat with everything and the kitchen sink. I swear we/I brought more stuff for 2 dogs than I ever packed for Anna and David.

Beautiful conditions greeted us as we left Sandusky Bay except that the wind was in the NE – absolutely the worst direction for anchoring/going on a ball at Put-In-Bay. However, there is one spot, the SW corner of Middle Bass Island which is a safe anchorage in NE’ly, so long as you trust the forecast when it says the wind will stay in the NE; which, for last night, it did.

Swimming yesterday evening for the dogs rather than a run ashore and the same again this morning. Both dogs have now peed on the boat, phew and eventually pooped which is a major breakthrough. (Some people are now thinking TMI but when boating with dogs, this is a really big deal.)

IMG_1103.jpgLeft Middle Bass Island just before 7 this morning and set course for Detroit River. Cut the corner of Canadian waters without reporting in so now I begin to get paranoid. (Again, long story – another blog.) As luck would have it, as we were closing in on the river channel, I was keeping tabs on a vessel that seemed to be keeping tabs on us. She (the vessel) was slowly closing the distance between us but following the channel rather than cutting the corner. Judging by the shape of her, her lines and superstructure, I surmised that it was a Coast Guard vessel but couldn’t be sure whether US or Canadian. Turns out it was Canadian and it was going to its base just up the Detroit River. Phew.

But my paranoia did not get a rest. As that vessel docked, another Coast Guard vessel left and followed us all the way up the river. And then, just as we were about to exit into Lake St Clair, a border patrol boat comes tearing up in our wake to about 3 boat lengths away, slows down, looks at our boat name (I assume), hangs there for another few minutes and then takes off. I was so certain that this one was going to board us. But, they didn’t.

IMG_1104.JPGWe did get to practice Man Overboard. No, a dog didn’t jump over or fall in. I had just given them two new toys and as I was about to go back up on to the bridge, I saw float passed, the bright pink squeaky spikey ring I had, literally, 30 seconds ago, given to Ebba. Not sure which one dropped it but both looked a little bewildered, as in, “Where has it gone? Oops.” I was quite vocal, not in an angry way but Paul looked up from steering, caught sight of it and did an about-turn. And within 1 minute we had retrieved it. By then, though, neither dog wanted to play with it. Later maybe. When we eventually docked, I found that the other new toy I had given them was MIA. Nowhere to be found.

IMG_1138.JPGSo now, as I type, we have been going for almost 8 hours and they have both been brilliant. Very placid, sleepy, not anxious. It did get a little bouncy over the first half of Lake St Clair so I brought them down to the main cabin and both disappeared down into the aft cabin and have slept again for most of the way. Ebba, at one point, was doing quite a bit of drooling and licking; thought she was feeling sea sick but she has survived without being physically ill. Couldn’t ask for more.

Made it to South Channel YC a little way up St Clair River – our usual stopping off place before launching ourselves out into Lake Huron. Normally we stay one night and leave early the next day but the wind really built overnight and today so we decided to spend another night here. The dogs loved it. Paul tied their swim ladder to the dock so they had free access to it and that’s what they did. Swim, swim, swim. And a little paddle boarding.

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Tomorrow, Sarnia CAN. Maybe. 🙂

IMG_0530.jpgWednesday evening, hanging on a ball at Put-In-Bay, 15 minutes before sundown and the dogs were driving me crazy and we still haven’t got the dogs to pee or poop on the boat. So I bundled them into the dinghy and drove at top speed to the shore to accommodate them. The time crunch was because I didn’t have the navigation lights/flash light on the boat. Five minutes to shore, 5 min walk/pee/poop, 5 min back to the boat. Phew, made it.

Ha, should have realized. I came alongside the swim platform and before I or Paul had got proper hold, Ebba decided to try to climb out of the dinghy. She put her front paws on the swim platform but didn’t jump immediately. As a consequence, she pushed the dinghy away from the boat and, plop, splash, she fell gracefully into the ever-widening gap.

As it turned out, it was a good time to practice ‘dog overboard’ drill and to put into practice the recovery plan I devised after the last time Ebba decided to separate herself from the dinghy in deep water. And it worked. I managed to maneuver her around and lift her front legs on and in to the dinghy. After that, she and I managed to haul her out; Ebba helping by getting her back legs pretty high up the inflated tube of the dinghy.

None the worse for wear and totally un-phased by the experience, she was ready to try again. But not tonight, my dear.
IMG_0473.JPGOne really special thing happens when boating with dogs, Paul cooks breakfast while I am out walking the dogs and then more often that not, he does the washing up also.

Earlier in the day, Paul had rigged up the dock gangplank with some buoyancy and hung it off the dinghy so that the dogs were able to climb into and out of the water on their own. Fun times.

Thursday morning, I took the dogs ashore for their early morning constitutional. They were wearing their leashes and I had hold of them, and as we closed the shore, the dogs and I saw the flock of ducks that hang out around the ‘beach’. I was continually saying ‘No, No….’ and lightly jerking the leashes to remind the dogs I meant No. (I wish to goodness I had had a video camera trained on us because what happened next must have been the funniest sight ever.)

Just as I turned to the right, and took my eyes off the dogs and the ducks, to pull the plug on the outboard, my left hand/arm and then my whole being, suddenly whiplashed leftwards. The dogs had chosen to completely disregarded my ‘No’ or interpreted it to mean ‘jump over the side, drag Jo, with or without the dinghy, with you and chase the ducks’ because that is exactly what they did. So I am sitting in the dinghy holding on for dear life with my legs while being pulled at quite a rate, sideways along the shore, the outboard’s propeller is bumping on the stones. F..k F..k F..k. STOP!!! Needless to say, the dogs didn’t seem to notice that my sandals got wet, again, as I dragged them and the dinghy back to the landing steps.

IMG_0501.jpgWent paddle boarding with them later. I ended up with both on my board which made even my floating sidewalk unstable. We all ended up in the water but that’s OK because we are waterproof.

I have been trying for the last few weeks to actually find this account and my page. Thanks to Google search I was able to find the necessary links to get back to it. Scrolling down through my previous posts brought back many good memories and also made me think my mind works in weird ways. But it’s all good.

The reason I decided I wanted to get back into my blog was that we have started boating with dogs. For all of you who have done this/are doing this, I am absolutely sure you will be able to relate and think, “Ha, been there done that!” These posts probably won’t be on a regular, say weekly, basis, but as and when I have something to share, believe me, I will.

This first blog in this series is from last week. Over the next few blogs, I will probably reminisce to previous occasions.

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Captain and his dog with Cedar Point in the background

We spent a few days up on Lake Erie last week and cruised over to Kelley’s Island for Wednesday night. Before we got there and whilst there, this happened.

Bella, the black one and younger one, won’t go to the toilet on the boat (we are working on that) so when she needs to go one of us has to take her all the way ashore (almost 300m) just for her to go pee. Ebba will go potty on the dock; she’s not comfortable going on the boat but will if really necessary. So in the middle of the night, fortunately it wasn’t raining, Bella decided she needed to go so both dogs and I traipse (sp?) in my skinny PJ’s to the shore. Both do the necessary and we are half way back to the boat (it’s a very dark night) and Ebba decides to start play fighting with Bella. Bella backs up, straight over the edge of the dock. Dark night dark water dark dog. Not a good combination. The dock is 2′ above the water and I wasn’t going swimming. Though by the time I eventually got Bella out I might as well have done because I was soaked. 💦💦😤 Needless to say I was not happy with Ebba.

There’s more. Thought that with the midnight swim they might sleep just a little later. Haha no such luck so this put me in a really foul mood. 😡 We were about to leave for Kelleys Island so went ashore with the dogs one last time. Climbing back onboard Ebba gets up the gang plank and onboard. Bella’s on her way up so I climbed onboard and went into the cabin. 2 min later Paul asks where’s Bella? I don’t know, on the boat somewhere. No she isn’t. Oh oh panic. We find her wedged under the dock in the metal structure that holds it all in place. All we can surmise is that she didn’t quite make it on to the deck, over balanced and fell in. Again. But now our problem was that we had to pull her back out of her refuge, into the water and back on to more terra firma. Have you any idea how strong and inflexible a scared dog can be? It took the two of us a good 5 min to pry her out. All the while we are trying not to hold her around her belly where her operation scar was trying to heal. 😱 And we are working upside down with our heads almost in the water. I was wet again. (Functional fitness.)

Eventually made it to Kelleys and tied up and had a good afternoon. Thursday morning I took them for a walk and got coffee (they have something right on the island) and on the way back both dogs took off into the water swimming after a big flock of geese. When the dogs were about 150m offshore I decided that they might need reminding to come back. Bella came but not Ebba. She had the bit between her teeth and was going to catch a goose if it killed her. The dog whistle didn’t seem to have any effect ( normally it is instantaneous ) – selective hearing. And she decided to be impervious to the shock collar for once. I had almost given up when I saw her turn and start making her way back (400m offshore). But then she disappeared again. Aaaggghhh!  😤 3-4 min later the little shit came running out of the bushes on the shore looking like the cat who got the cream even though she didn’t catch a goose. 😳 They both slept all afternoon and night. 😴💤 Sorry this is so long but had to set the scene. 😊

And then there was the snake. Bella had just taken herself off the boat onto the dock and was just smoozing, sniffing etc when she went on point. Stood stock-still. I realised she was pointing at a snake. Very cautiously, one tiny step at a time – took probably 5 min- she inched her way towards the snake. It raised its head very slowly and looked at her. Just as she was about to stick her nose in its coils, it slithered off the dock into the water. Bella leapt high and backwards fortunately not too far though, maintaining her foothold on the dock. After this encounter though, every coiled rope was a potential snake so getting ashore for a pee took for e-v-e-r  🐉😕  It was just a black water snake. I’m told they are not poisonous but will bite if cornered.

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Bella not feeling the joy of boating; was a little rough out on the lake

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Duck watching at sunset

Have a great and safe 4th July.

Joanna